Welcome to Our Parish

We are Our Mother

of Perpetual Help Parish

On January 1, 2014, Our Lady of Fatima, which was founded in 1950, and St. James, which was founded in 1919, became Our Mother of Perpetual Help Parish. Both churches have a rich and wonderful history.  However, as Our Mother of Perpetual Help we are dedicated to moving forward into our future with compassion, generosity and an openness of spirit.

We believe that the nurturing of the community around the Eucharistic Table is extended through gatherings which further strengthen and support us.  We foster this faithfully through the power of the Holy Spirit and the gifts and talents of our members.  We continue to walk our journey together with the Lord, our future secure in the knowledge that we have common goals in God's ever-present love. Father Paul Chateau is our Pastor and leads our parish.  

Photo is of our Pastor - Fr. Paul during his homily at the first Mass as Our Mother of Perpetual Help Parish which was held on January 1, 2014 - The Solemnity of Mary, The Holy Mother of God.

 

 

 

Join Us at Mass

WEEKEND MASS SCHEDULE


Saturday, 4:30 PM - St. James
Sunday, 9:00 AM - Our Lady of Fatima Church
Sunday, 11:00 AM - St. James Church

 

MONDAY through FRIDAY MASS - 9:00 AM

Monday, Wednesday, Friday at Our Lady of Fatima Church
Tuesday and Thursday* at St. James Church

* Call the parish office at 248.545.2310 to ascertain where the 1st Thursday of the Month 7:00 PM Mass will be celebrated

 

Solemnity of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary

Holy Day of Obligation

9:00 am Mass at Our Lady of Fatima

7:00 pm Mass at St. James

From Archbishop Vigneron

 

August 13, 2018 
 

Dear Brothers and Sisters in Christ,

        My prayers today are with the victims of abuse at the hands of clergy worldwide, particularly those represented in the grand jury report in Pennsylvania. The allegations contained in that report, as well as recent allegations of sinful behavior involving former Cardinal Theodore McCarrick – regardless of when and where they happened – are daunting tests of faith for you in the Church, her leadership and our ongoing efforts towards abuse prevention and response.

 

        To begin, be assured that I am one with you in lamenting all of the hurt and pain caused by these moral failures – failures by those who have committed sins against chastity and failures by those who ought to have used their authority to prevent these acts, respond so as to help heal the wounds inflicted, and to ensure that the perpetrators lost their positions of authority. I have met with victim-survivors of sexual abuse and exploitation, and have heard firsthand of the grave harm they have suffered. I continue to pray for them, with confidence that because of the death and rising of Christ, no evil is beyond his healing power.

 

        I acknowledge, too, how disheartening it is for us once again to come face-to-face with moral failures in the priesthood, especially among us bishops. I realize how discouraging it is that we have not decisively overcome these sins after all these years. These sins are marks of shame upon the Church and a great weight impeding the progress we strive so zealously to make in advancing the Lord’s Kingdom. In order to find a graced-ray of guiding light in the gloom, I have returned to the 23 April 2002 address of St. John Paul II to the cardinals of the United States during the height of the abuse crisis. Now, as much as then, these words of this great pope and pastor ring true, and so I share them here:

It must be absolutely clear to the Catholic faithful, and to the wider community, that Bishops and superiors are concerned, above all else, with the spiritual good of souls. People need to know that there is no place in the priesthood and religious life for those who would harm the young.

        Shortly after the Holy Father affirmed this principle, the Catholic bishops in the United States joined together to create and implement The Charter for the Protection of Children and Young People, a set of norms designed to ensure the safety of the most vulnerable in our communities. Today, our Archdiocese of Detroit requires safe environment training programs for clergy, employees, volunteers and children. When allegations of wrongdoing surface, we report them to local police, fully cooperate with their investigations and, in the case of substantiated reports, publicize the names of those accused. In addition, we encourage those who have been abused to come forward, and stress there are no deadlines or restrictions on bringing a complaint to us. Be it five, fifteen, or 50 years later, our dioceses accept and respond to all reports.

 

        This summer’s news reports affirm why we – as bishops, priests, Church representatives and lay people – must be ever vigilant to protect children from abuse and must re-double our efforts of outreach and healing to those most harmed by sexual abuse. I remain fully committed to this goal. We can never become complacent with what has been accomplished.

 

        Similarly, in the light of reports about former Cardinal McCarrick’s sins against chastity, I affirm that priests who try to live a double life by “cheating on the Church” through impure relations with others need to repent or to give up their pastoral office. I am committed to helping all our bishops, priests and deacons cultivate those habits which reinforce their commitments to lives of holiness, and holding them accountable for maintaining the virtue of chastity.

 

        Likewise, I acknowledge that I, too, am accountable for living up to my commitment to celibacy. To that end, it is essential that I adhere to my habits of prayer and asceticism, especially regular Confession and spiritual direction. In standing before Christ’s judgment, I humbly give an accounting for myself, acknowledging my weaknesses and asking for pardon and healing. Were I to lapse in my chastity, I should be corrected not only by those in authority over me, but by any brother or sister who had knowledge of my fall.

 

        My response to those who break their vows of chastity is to resort to the medicine of the Gospel: a call to repentance and renewal, using all the supernatural and natural remedies at our disposal for repairing moral failure. As your bishop, I recommit to preserve and advance the life of celibate chastity in the life of our priests, for their sake and for the good of the whole Christian community. If you cannot trust us, we cannot serve you.

 

        In the course of his remarks in 2002, St. John Paul also called upon us bishops to be clear in teaching the whole of the good news of Christ on matters of sexual morality. He pointed out that this is an essential condition for renewal:

They [the faithful] must know that Bishops and priests are totally committed to the fullness of Catholic truth on matters of sexual morality, a truth as essential to the renewal of the priesthood and the episcopate as it is to the renewal of marriage and family life.

        Here, in this address to you, I renew my resolve to be the sort of good shepherd I hear St. John Paul calling for me to be. I owe that not only to you and to the Church, but to Christ himself. The message handed on to us from the apostles about the norms for chaste living is of one piece, an integrated whole. To cover over, not to mention dissenting from, one part of Christ’s vision for chaste living is to weaken every other dimension of that sexual purity Christ demands of his followers. The new Adam is one in all his parts.

 

        Weak teaching about the demands of the Christian life makes it easier for us to lapse into vice, and thus pushes us toward personal and communal shipwreck. While policies and best practices are necessary, we will never be able to create, as T.S. Eliot once put it, “systems so perfect that no one will need to be good.” Nothing can replace the need for each of us to strive for personal holiness in our sexuality. I know this, and am resolved to do my part by my teaching and leading as Christ expects.

 

        This seems to be an appropriate place for me to affirm to you, as part of my accounting of my stewardship of the leadership of our local Church, my endorsement of what Cardinal DiNardo, as the President of our Bishops’ Conference, wrote on 1 August:

The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops will pursue the many questions surrounding Archbishop McCarrick’s conduct to the full extent of its authority; and where that authority finds its limits, the Conference will advocate with those who do have the authority. One way or the other, we are determined to find the truth in this matter.

        We must give an accounting for the failures that have occurred. While policies and best practices are never substitutes for moral integrity and virtue, they are nonetheless necessary. They do much to protect the vulnerable and to create clarity about what needs to happen when things go wrong. We bishops must look honestly at how this situation unfolded, and I want you to know that I am committed to joining my brother bishops in seeing this work through.

 

        Even with our renewed prayers and support for our dedicated priests and deacons, I note a temptation to despair among some over whether things can change. However, we know that reform can only happen when hope lives. We must move forward with the conviction that God will not abandon his Church. He wants her purified, cleansed of these sins and brought to new life. St. John Paul II concluded his 2002 discourse with these words of encouragement:

We must be confident that this time of trial will bring a purification of the entire Catholic community, a purification that is urgently needed if the Church is to preach more effectively the Gospel of Jesus Christ in all its liberating force. Now you must ensure that where sin increased, grace will all the more abound. So much pain, so much sorrow must lead to a holier priesthood, a holier episcopate, and a holier Church.

        By the power of the risen Christ, this hour of darkness is a moment to anticipate the dawn. We are called to cooperate with the Holy Spirit to turn what could deflect us from the work of the new evangelization into an opportunity to proclaim the Lordship of Christ over all sin – yes, even these sins of which we are so painfully aware in these days.

 

        Please pray for me, that I may be a good pastor and that God’s power will be made perfect in the weaknesses and shortcomings I bring to my ministry. Know also that I pray each day for you, that you might find peace and light in these difficult times.

 

Sincerely yours in Christ,

The Most Reverend Allen H. Vigneron

Archbishop of Detroit


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Prayer to Our Mother of Perpetual Help

Our Mother of Perpetual Help, 

Today we face so many difficulties. You remind us to reach out and help those in need. Help us understand that our lives belong to others as much as they belong to us. Mary, Model of Christian love, we know we cannot heal every ill or solve every problem. But with God's grace, we intend to do what we can. May we be true witnesses to the world that love for one another really matters. May our daily actions proclaim how fully our lives are modeled after yours, Mother of Perpetual Help. Amen.

Upcoming Events at Our Mother of Perpetual Help

 

Wednesday, August 15

Feast of the Assumption

of the Blessed Virgin Mary

Holy Day of Obligation

9:00 am Mass            OLOF C

7:00 pm Mass            SJ C

Thursday, August 16

11:00 am 50+ Club Meeting (50+) OLOF GA

Monday, August 20

10:30 am Monday Morning Prayer Group (WC) OLOF GA

Thursday, August 23

6:00 pm  DRIVE Core Team Meeting OLOF BH

7:00 pm DRIVE Race & Immigration Meeting  OLOF BH

Monday, August 27

10:30 am  Monday Morning Prayer Group (WC) OLOF GA

 

 

 

Our Mission Statement

Our Mother of Perpetual Help Parish is a welcoming and nurturing Catholic community building up the Body of Christ through prayer and service.

Our Vision Statement

Our vision is to be an extraordinary spiritual gathering place where people of all backgrounds and ages are welcome to question and learn, pray, worship, and serve.  In community through prayer and worship we hope to continue to grow together in our understanding and appreciation of God’s love.  We strive to change and improve our lives and the lives of others.

Publications


  • Sun, Aug 19th

  • Sun, Aug 12th

  • Sun, Aug 5th

  • Sun, Jul 29th

  • Sun, Jul 22nd
Older Publications »

Staff

Office Hours

Office Hours at Our Lady of Fatima are
Monday through Friday 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM

Office Hours at St. James are Tuesday and Thursday 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM

PARISH PHONE: 248-545-2310
PARISH FAX: 248-545-2312
PARISH EMAIL: fatimaofficeolofsj@gmail.com

If there is an emergency, when the office is closed, please contact the parish office at 248.545.2310.

Parish Office

The Our Mother of Perpetual Help Parish Office is located at

Our Lady of Fatima

13500 Oak Park Blvd. (on the northeast corner of Oak Park Blvd. and Coolidge Hwy.)

Oak Park, Michigan  48237

Photo Albums

Directions to Our Lady of Fatima Church

Photo Albums

Directions to St. James Church

Thank you for your generosity

Click here to donate online

If you have any questions or concerns about online giving please contact Mark Wonsil, our Finance Council Vice chairperson, at  mark.wonsil@gmail.com Nisha Jayasundera, our Finance Council chairperson, at nishaomoph@gmail.com

Spotlight on Saints and Observances for the Week

Saint Jane Frances De Chantal—August 12

Saint Jane Frances de Chantal was a wife and the mother of six. When her husband was killed, Saint Jane took a vow not to remarry and sought to join a religious community. She was dissuaded by her spiritual director, Saint Francis de Sales.   Eventually, she and two others founded a community intended for those who could not join the established congregations. They wanted to actively engage in the works of mercy, but social circumstances forced them to live a cloistered life.

 

Saint Maximilian Mary Kolbe—August 14

Saint Maximilian Mary Kolbe, a Conventual Franciscan, is best known for volunteering to take the place of a condemned prisoner in the death camp. But he also worked tirelessly for the spiritual welfare of people through a deep devotion to the Blessed Mother. His whole life seemed to revolve around Mary as the path to God.

 

Solemnity Of The Assumption Of Mary—August 15

The doctrine of the Assumption of Mary is recent: 1950. But the belief among the faithful that Mary was assumed body and soul into heaven at the time of her death dates to the early Church. Mary is also the summation of all Christians—what happened to her, will happen to us. Thus, she is the testimony of our own resurrection at the end of time.

 

 

 

 

For more information visit
https://www.franciscanmedia.org/source/saint-of-the-day

 

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In The Words of Pope Francis

"Cruelty is a human attitude that is right at the  basis of all wars, all of them. The cruelty that prevents people from growing, that kills the other, that also kills the good name of another person. When a person speaks badly of another, this is cruel: it is cruel because it destroys that person's reputation. But, you know, I like to repeat an expression when I speak about this cruelty of language: gossip is terrorism, the terrorism of gossip. The cruelty of language is like launching a bomb that destroys you or destroys anyone, and the one who throws it does not harm  himself. This is a form of terrorism, it is something that we have to defeat.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

From Pope Francis

Pope Francis-Easter-Message and "Urbi et Orbi" Blessing